Illini Chemist

  • Professor Yankwich was internationally recognized for his contributions to three fields of scientific research: the chemical effects of nuclear transformations, the application of radiocarbon tracers to the elucidation of chemical reaction mechanisms, and isotope mass effects on chemical reaction rates. His principal contribution was a long series of experimental and theoretical studies of isotope rate effects.
  • Gregorio Weber's research career, spanning more than half a century, was characterized by an unbroken chain of highly original and important contributions to fluorescence spectroscopy and protein chemistry. As a result of his investigations employing the fluorescence techniques in conjunction with perturbations by pressure and temperature, Weber presented, in the last few years of his life, a novel way of looking at the folding and association of proteins.
  • G. Frederick Smith, as he was more generally known, was born in Lucasville, Ohio, and raised in Columbus, Ohio.

  • When William Rose was 19 he started as a graduate student in the Sheffield Scientific School at Yale. Four years later, in 1911, he finished his PhD with L. B.

  • Worth Huff Rodebush was born on a farm near Selden, Kansas in 1887.

  • Kenneth L.

  • Samuel W. Parr was born in Granville, Illinois, and graduated with a BS from the University of Illinois in 1884.

  • Arthur W. Palmer was born in London, England in 1861. He obtained a BS in chemistry at the University of Illinois in 1883 and an ScD in chemistry from Harvard in 1886.

  • William Albert Noyes was born on November 6, 1857, on a farm near Independence, Iowa, the youngest son of Spencer W. Noyes and Mary Noyes.

  • Timothy Alan Nieman was born on December 31, 1948 in Mount Healthy, Ohio, the son of Orville and Emma Nieman.  He was a member of Boy Scout Troop 275 in Mount Healthy, where he earned Life Scout ra

  • by Dr. R S. Juvet, Professor of Chemistry Emeritus, ASU Professor Emeritus

  • C. S. Marvel was born in Waynesville, Illinois on September 2, 1894.

  • Howard Vincent Malmstadt, faculty of the Department of Chemistry at the University of Illinois from 1951 to 1981, was widely considered the father of modern electronic and computerized instrumentat

  • Nelson J.

  • Herbert Sander Gutowsky's pioneering work made nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy one of the most effective tools in chemical and medical research.