Spotlights

  • Head of chemistry and James R. Eiszner Endowed Chair in chemistry and Professor of Physics and Center for Biophysics and quantitative Biology
  • Professor Andrew A. Gewirth received his AB from Princeton University in 1981 and his PhD from Stanford University in 1987. He joined the Illinois faculty in 1988 after postdoctoral work at the University of Texas, Austin. Research in his group focuses on the structure and reactivity of surfaces and interfaces.
  • Professor Yankwich was internationally recognized for his contributions to three fields of scientific research: the chemical effects of nuclear transformations, the application of radiocarbon tracers to the elucidation of chemical reaction mechanisms, and isotope mass effects on chemical reaction rates. His principal contribution was a long series of experimental and theoretical studies of isotope rate effects.
  • Gregorio Weber's research career, spanning more than half a century, was characterized by an unbroken chain of highly original and important contributions to fluorescence spectroscopy and protein chemistry. As a result of his investigations employing the fluorescence techniques in conjunction with perturbations by pressure and temperature, Weber presented, in the last few years of his life, a novel way of looking at the folding and association of proteins.
  • G. Frederick Smith, as he was more generally known, was born in Lucasville, Ohio, and raised in Columbus, Ohio. Smith attended the University of Michigan, and received his BS, MS and PhD (1922) degrees, the PhD obtained under H. H. Willard in analytical chemistry.
  • When William Rose was 19 he started as a graduate student in the Sheffield Scientific School at Yale. Four years later, in 1911, he finished his PhD with L. B. Mendel, finishing a series of studies on the origin of creatine and creatinine.
  • Worth Huff Rodebush was born on a farm near Selden, Kansas in 1887. As his biographers stated, "The child of a frontier, rural society which had little interest in pure science, he became part of the scholarly community which developed modern physical chemistry."
  • Kenneth L. Rinehart, a  chemistry professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign who was internationally known for his research on organic compounds involved in biological activity, died June 13, 2005 at his Urbana home after a long illness. He was 76.
  • Samuel W. Parr was born in Granville, Illinois, and graduated with a BS from the University of Illinois in 1884. He spent a year in graduate work at Cornell University, from which he received an MS degree in 1885.
  • Arthur W. Palmer was born in London, England in 1861. He obtained a BS in chemistry at the University of Illinois in 1883 and an ScD in chemistry from Harvard in 1886. He then spent a year in Germany, studying first with Victor Meyer and then with August Hofmann.
  • William Albert Noyes was born on November 6, 1857, on a farm near Independence, Iowa, the youngest son of Spencer W. Noyes and Mary Noyes.
  • Timothy Alan Nieman was born on December 31, 1948 in Mount Healthy, Ohio, the son of Orville and Emma Nieman.  He was a member of Boy Scout Troop 275 in Mount Healthy, where he earned Life Scout rank and the God and Country Award.  After receiving a bachelor's degree in chemistry from Purdue Univ
  • by Dr. R S. Juvet, Professor of Chemistry Emeritus, ASU Professor Emeritus Therald Moeller, past Chairman of the Department of Chemistry at ASU, died November 24 in Broken Arrow, OK, at the age of 84.
  • C. S. Marvel was born in Waynesville, Illinois on September 2, 1894. Marvel was first introduced to chemistry while a freshman at Illinois Wesleyan on the recommendation that "the next generation of farmers was going to need scientific knowledge to get the most out of their work".
  • oward Vincent Malmstadt, faculty of the Department of Chemistry at the University of Illinois from 1951 to 1981, was widely considered the father of modern electronic and computerized instrumentation in chemistry.
  • Nelson J. Leonard, one of the most important chemists of the twentieth century, was not only a master in the application of organic synthesis to the solution of important problems in chemistry, biochemistry, and plant physiology, but very highly regarded as a professional colleague.
  • Paul C.
  • Dr. Gilbert P. Haight Jr., best known for his pioneering work in chemical education, died on Monday, April 17, 2015 of natural causes.
  • Herbert Sander Gutowsky's pioneering work made nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy one of the most effective tools in chemical and medical research. Born November 8, 1919, on a produce farm in Bridgman, Michigan, Gutowsky was the son of Otto and Hattie Neyer Gutowsky.
  • David Y. Gin was born on May 16, 1967 and raised in Ashcroft, British Columbia. He received his BSc in Chemistry at the University of British Columbia in 1989, where he performed summer undergraduate research under the direction of Professor Tom Money.
  • University of Illinois colleagues remember Bill Flygare as "one of the most creative and dynamic physical chemists in the world." Shortly before his death in 1981, Professor Flygare was awarded the Irving Langmuir Prize in Chemical Physics and was cited for:
  • University of Illinois, 1927-1963
  • Harry Drickamer Symposium, March 15, 2004
  • St. Elmo Brady was the first African American to obtain a PhD degree in chemistry in the United States. He received the PhD in Chemistry at the University of Illinois in 1916 for work done in Noyes Laboratory.
  • Rue Linn Belford was born in St. Louis, Missouri on December 13, 1931 to the late Rue L. Belford and Fannie Belford (neé Kelley).